NutriBuilder®


NutriBuilder® is a new nutritional feed additive belonging to the group "amino acid, their salts and analogue" which is authorized by China, EU and USA. 




NutriBuilder® (Guanidinoacetic acid, GAA) is a high-tech, green and efficient feed supplement, manufactured and developed by Beijing Gendone Biotechnology Co., Ltd. It concentrates 15-years research and knowledge from Gendone and China agricultural scientists and has been widely accepted and used by local & foreign customers for more than 10 years. As the exclusive precursor of creatine, guanidinoacetic acid has been authorized by China, Europe and USA as a new feed additive, and widely proved with significant improvements in growth performance, carcass traits, meat quality and reproduction performance.






Guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) is the direct endogenous precursor of creatine in the organism of all vertebrates. Creatine biosynthesis is a two-step process. In the kidney, arginine transfers its amidino group to glycine to synthesize GAA. GAA is transferred to the liver, where S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) gives its methyl group to GAA to synthesize creatine. 







Creatine is then transported by the bloodstream to the target cells with high energy need, such as skeletal muscle, heart, brain, sperm and immune cells. Creatine plays a key role in energy transfer and supply via creatine-phosphocreatine system. Dietary supplemental NutriBuilder® can increase creatine levels in the body by 20%.








High content of GAA, strict quality control for residues





NutriBuilder®


NutriBuilder® is a new nutritional feed additive belonging to the group "amino acid, their salts and analogue" which is authorized by China, EU and USA. 



Effects of guanidinoacetic acid on growth performance, creatine metabolism and plasma amino acid profile in broilers


Dongting He Libin Yang Juntao Li Bing Dong Wenqing Lai Liying Zhang



State Key Laboratory of Animal Nutrition, Ministry of Agriculture Feed Industry Centre, China Agricultural University, Beijing, China


Correspondence: Liying Zhang, State Key Laboratory of Animal Nutrition, Ministry of Agriculture Feed Industry Centre, China Agricultural University, Beijing, China. Email: zhangliying01@sina.com





The objective of this study was to assess the effects of guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) on growth performance, creatine deposition and blood amino acid (AA) profile on broiler chickens. In Exp. 1, a total of 540 one‐day‐old Arbor Acres male broilers (average initial body weight, 45.23 ± 0.35 g) were divided randomly into five treatments with six replicates of 18 chicks each. Broilers were fed corn–soybean meal‐basal diets supplemented with 0, 600, 800, 1,000 or 1,200 mg/kg GAA for 42 days respectively. Results showed that dietary GAA inclusion increased average daily gain (ADG) and improved gain‐to‐feed ratio (G:F) from 1 to 42 days (p < 0.01). However, average daily feed intake was unaffected by dietary supplementation of GAA. In Exp. 2, a total of 432 one‐day‐old Arbor Acres male broilers (average initial body weight, 39.78 ± 0.58 g) were divided randomly into four treatments with six replicates of 18 chicks each. Birds were fed a corn soybean meal basal diet supplemented with 0, 200, 400 or 600 mg/kg GAA for 42 days respectively. Dietary inclusion of 600 mg/kg GAA significantly increased ADG and G:F of broilers (p < 0.05). In conclusion, dietary supplementation of 600-1,200 mg/kg GAA can effectively improve the growth performance in broiler chickens by affecting creatine metabolism and utilization efficiency of essential AA, and 600 mg/kg GAA is the minimum dose for improving performance.


Keywords: amino acid profile, broiler, creatine, growth performance, guanidinoacetic acid



1 Methods



1.1 General procedure


Experiment 1 was performed to determine the effect of dietary concentration of GAA in broiler diets. On the basis of Exp. 1, Exp. 2 was designed to further optimize the inclusion level of GAA in broilers. The GAA used in this study was provided by Gendone Agriculture Technology Co., Ltd (Beijing, China), with purity of more than 98%. The corn–soybean meal‐basal diets (Table 1) for the experiments were formulated to meet or exceed nutrient requirements suggested by NRC (1994).



Note. ME: metabolizable energy, ME values were calculated using NRC (1994) values.
aProvided per kilogram of diet: vitamin A, 9,000 IU; vitamin D3, 3,000 IU; vitamin E, 24 mg; vitamin K3, 1.8 mg; thiamine, 2.0 mg; riboflavin, 5.0 mg; pyridoxine, 3.0 mg; cobalamin, 0.1 mg; nicotinic acid, 40 mg; pantothenic acid, 15 mg; folic acid, 1.0 mg; biotin, 0.05 mg; choline chloride, 500 mg; iron (from FeSO4), 80 mg; copper (from CuSO4), 20 mg; zinc (from ZnSO4),  90 mg; manganese  (from  MnSO4),  80 mg;  iodine  (from KI),0.35 mg; selenium (from Na2SeO3), 0.35 mg. bAll nutrient levels except metabolizable energy were analysed, and values represent means of two determinations.




1.2 Experiment 1


1.2.1 Experimental design


A total of 540 (average initial body weight, 45.23 ± 0.35 g) one‐day‐ old Arbor Acres male chicks were obtained from Arbor Acres Poultry Breeding Company (Beijing, China). On day 1, all birds were allocated randomly to five treatment groups with six replicates of 18 chicks each for 42 days and fed one of the five diets supplemented with 0, 600, 800, 1,000 or 1,200 mg/kg GAA respectively.




1.2.2 Collection of performance data 


The mortality for each treatment was recorded daily, and the aver‐ age mortality was <1%. On days 21 and 42, the body weight and feed consumption of broilers in each pen after fasting for 12 hr were recorded and these data were used to calculate ADG, average daily feed intake (ADFI) and gain to feed ratio (G:F) for the periods of 1–21 days, 22–42 days and the overall period of the experiment.




1.3 Experiment 2


 A total of 432 (average initial body weight, 39.78 ± 0.58 g) one‐day‐ old Arbor Acres male chicks were allocated randomly to four treatments with six replicates of 18 chicks each for 42 days and fed one of four diets supplemented with 0, 200, 400 or 600 mg/kg GAA re‐ spectively. The growth performance was determined as described for Exp. 1.




1.4 Statistical analysis


Data from both experiments were analysed using the MIXED pro‐ cedure of SAS (version 9.2; SAS Inst. Inc., Cary, NC). Differences among treatments were separated by the Tukey test for multiple comparisons. Orthogonal polynomial contrast coefficients were used to determine the linear and quadratic effect of increasing level of dietary GAA on the measured traits. The pen served as the experimental unit. Results are reported as means. A probability level of p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant




2 Results



2.1 Experiment 1


The effects of graded levels of GAA in diets on growth performance in Exp. 1 are presented in Table 2. Compared with the control group, dietary supplemental with 600 mg/kg to 1,200 mg/kg GAA increased (p < 0.05) the ADG and G:F in both starter and grower periods. However, GAA supplementation did not affect (p > 0.05) ADFI of broilers throughout the experiment. 



Note. Data are the means of six replicates per treatment with 18 birds per pen.
aProvided BW: body weight; ADG: average daily gain; ADFI: average daily feed intake; G:F: gain‐to‐feed ratio; GAA: guanidinoacetic acid. a,bMeans within a row with different superscripts are significantly different (p < 0.05).





2.2 Experiment 2


The effects of graded levels of GAA in diets on growth performance in Exp. 2 are presented in Table 5. Supplementation of diet with 600 mg/kg GAA maximized ADG and G:F (p < 0.05) in starter and grower periods. Similar to Exp. 1, dietary inclusion of GAA had no effect (p > 0.05) on ADFI of broilers.



Note. Data are the means of six replicates per treatment with 18 birds per pen.
BW, body weight; ADG, average daily gain; ADFI, average daily feed intake; G:F, gain‐to‐feed ratio; GAA: guanidinoacetic acid.
a,bMeans within a row with different superscripts are significantly different (p  < 0.05).




3 Conclusions



In conclusion, dietary supplementation of 600–1,200 mg/kg GAA can effectively improve the growth performance in broiler chickens by affecting creatine metabolism and utilization efficiency of essential AA, and 600 mg/kg GAA is the minimum dose for im‐ proving performance. 




This article is excerpted from “Effects of guanidinoacetic acid on growth performance, creatine metabolism and plasma amino acid profile in broilers”

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